How to Correct Overpronation (Fix these 3 Different Causes)

How to Correct Overpronation (Fix these 3 Different Causes)

There's No Single Solution for Pronated Feet

By Coach E

Overpronation is too much of a good thing. Pronation is a natural movement of the foot and ankle that occurs in healthy humans when we walk and run that helps absorb the shock of your foot striking the ground.

Overpronation is too much of a good thing. Pronation is a natural movement of the foot and ankle that occurs in healthy humans when we walk and run that helps absorb the shock of your foot striking the ground.

Pronation is a combination of 3 movements:

1) Eversion
2) Dorsiflexion
3) Forefoot abduction

Pronation is a natural movement of the foot and ankle that occurs in healthy humans when we walk and run that helps absorb the shock of your foot striking the ground.

Overpronation is when too much of these movements occur, which can lead to repetitive stress injuries and pain because if you’re overpronating, you’re putting excess stress on medial ankle and medial knee tissues.

Some of the issues that can crop up as a result of overpronation include:

Achiles tendonitis: in fact, a 2017 study showed that achilles tendon blood flow was decreased in overpronators, which can lead to impaired tissue recovery and pain. [1]

A 2017 study showed that achilles tendon blood flow was decreased in overpronators, which can lead to impaired tissue recovery and pain.

Plantar fasciitis: this 2014 study from the Journal of Biomechanics  shows that overpronation results in greater stress to the plantar fascia. [2]

Shin splints: also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, overpronation and a pronated foot posture showed strong evidence as a risk factor as outlined in this 2014 study. [3]

Shin splints: also known as medial tibial stress syndrome, overpronation and a pronated foot posture showed strong evidence as a risk factor as outlined in this 2014 study.

Patellofemoral pain syndrome: the same shin splints study also linked overpronation to PFPS.

As you can see, overpronation can result in a number of different issues.

So if you get knee pain and you have overpronation but your treatment only includes glute, quad and hamstring exercises and stretches, you’re missing a critical component of your rehab.

Here's why you shouldn't only do hamstring or glute stretches if you have overpronated feet.

How to Correct Overpronation

In today’s video, we’re going to explore some of the root causes that can lead to overpronation in the first place, that must be addressed to correct the problem at the source.

These 3 causes are by no means comprehensive as the human body can compensate in creative ways to get around dysfunctions you have.

If you’re an overpronator, I hope this gives you more insight into the issue and gets you thinking about how to fix it.

One exercise that I love that’s a part of my Lower Limb Control course is the Seated 4-Way MTP Slide.

While the technique looks simple, there are a few important cues that must be followed to make it effective.

Check it out here:

This is a great technique to do when you’re at the office or sitting around at home. If you can’t slide your foot, no worries, just get to end range where you can keep your foot flat and apply metatarsal pressure and you’ll still benefit. But it is definitely done best on surface where you can slide your foot while applying metatarsal pressure the whole time.

About the Author

Eric Wong (aka Coach E) is the founder of Precision Movement and has a degree in Kinesiology from the University of Waterloo. He's been a coach since 2005 and spent his early career training combat athletes including multiple UFC fighters and professional boxers. He now dedicates himself to helping active people eliminate pain and improve mobility. He lives in Toronto (Go Leafs Go!) with his wife and two kids and drinks black coffee at work and IPAs at play. Click here to learn more about Eric.